Why carpet cleaners are paying more to have their nails cleaned

The carpet cleaner industry has become a major target of a campaign by the federal government.The government is set to introduce a $10,000 fine for carpet cleaners who have left their nails in a dryer unattended for more than three hours.“This is a very serious issue and we will take action if it is proven,”…

Published by admin inJuly 24, 2021
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The carpet cleaner industry has become a major target of a campaign by the federal government.

The government is set to introduce a $10,000 fine for carpet cleaners who have left their nails in a dryer unattended for more than three hours.

“This is a very serious issue and we will take action if it is proven,” Health Minister Sussan Ley said on Thursday.

“We will also look at the practice of carpet cleaners to ensure it does not happen again.”

“We are asking anyone who has left their carpet cleaner unattended in the dryer for more time than that to come forward,” she said.

Ms Ley said the $10k fine would be imposed on any carpet cleaner who left their nail cleaner unattacked for more then three hours on any one day.

“If a person has left a nail cleaner in a drier for two hours or more without a carer, we will impose a $2,000 sanction on the person,” she told reporters.

“There are some carpet cleaners in our community who are very good and they do the work very well.”

In a separate statement, the federal Government said the carpet cleaner fine would “focus on the fact that carpet cleaners have neglected their duty of care” and would help to reduce “the number of carpet cleaner offences”.

“We need to work together to reduce carpet cleaner crime in our communities, particularly in our inner city areas,” Ms Ley said.

“The carpet cleaner levy will be in place for three years and will be available to carpet cleaners for $2.50 a day.”

She said the penalty would be applied to the carpet cleaners’ wages and wages and the cost of cleaning their homes, as well as any other related costs.

The fine was imposed by the Government after the National Crime Agency and Victorian Crime Commission investigated complaints from carpet cleaners and others in the carpet industry about the use of wet wipes, dry wipes and wet sanders.

The NCA, which is part of the Department of Health, said the fines would be administered by the Victorian Department of Social Services.

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